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20121205
20121213
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)
with president obama tuesday to discuss the soda ash called fiscal cliff and its impact on states and the economy. -- the so-called fiscal clef. members of the national governors' association spoke to reporters but the white house for about 15 minutes. >> good morning, everybody. i am the chair of the national governors' association, the governor of the telephone, -- of delaware, joined by the governor of oklahoma, the vice chair. and we are also joined by the governors of wisconsin and arkansas. we are three democrats and three republicans. we just had what i would say it was a very good meeting with the president. the issues we face as governors and states are considered as part of the discussions going on in washington. the president was very open. we talked about some of the issues we focus on as governors, one of those same opportunities for flexibility, in terms of some of the programs we partner with the federal government. he was open to that as well. and there is an impact not just from the fiscal issues, but the issues in terms of how the discussions here will impact the economy's back
cliff, the thing we have continued to look at is our economy. today in the whip's office we will have small family-owned businesses in there and talk about ways to protect the family business, continue to grow while at the same time make sure we solve this fiscal cliff. look, each and every day as we walk the halls, you continue to ask the questions. the fiscal cliff. we put the offer on the table and the president now has to engage. the next 72 hours are critical. if he sits back and continues to play politics, that will give going. this is the opportunity for the country to lead and opportunity for the president to lead. >> as these fiscal cliff negotiations and debate continues, i think it's important to remember that washington doesn't have a revenue problem, it has a spending problem. and under this administration, under president obama, we have seen record deficits and a record debt accumulate, and yet he keeps demanding that we raise taxes to pay for more spending. this will only hurt our economy. ernst and young has done an analysis of the president's proposal and said it will
walks this process the closer our economy gets fought fiscal cliff. -- gets to the fiscal cliff. here's what we know. we know that the president wants more stimulus spending and an increase in the debt limit without any cuts or reforms. that's not fixing our proble frankly, it's making it worse. on top of that, the president wants to raise taxes on many small business owners. now, even if we did exactly what the president wants, we would see red ink as far as the eye can see. that's not fixing our problem either. it's making it worse and it's hurting our economy. i think the members know i'm an optimist. i'm hopeful we can reach an agreement. this is a serious issue and there's a lot at stake. the american people sent us here to work together toward the best possible solution and that means cutting spending. if the preside doesn't agree with our approach, he's got an obligation to put forward a plan that can pass both chambers of the congress because right now the american people have to be scratching their heads and wondering whe minority leader, ms. pelosi, for five minutes. ms. pel
the confidence to grow an economy. it was proven over and over again. that is the model for this fiscal cliff discussion, making both the cuts and the reforms that are real and credible and politically difficult to reverse. send. it is the right signal to send to investors that we're serious about getting our financial house in order. i hope was that we do that. chairman, thank you. this is your last committee meeting and you will be missed. thank you again. >> going back to the analogy of the avalanche, when we had the subprime crisis, and there was no warning. one day the avalanche came and there was a total loss of confidence and a fall in the market. likewise, we did have the same type of avalanche come tomorrow. there is no more confidence, nobody buys are debt. -- our debts. they want to sell it andwe would have increased interest rates and huge economic problem. we have two things in front of us. not only the fiscal slope, but also the debt ceiling. treasury estimates at the end -- february. they are very close together. in solving it, would be better to put the debt ceiling in the pac
. the economy is improving on its own right now. and getting some much stronger. the impact of the fiscal cliff, while not something to be encouraged, may not be as bad as many have thought. and certainly is not worth making bad policy that will have much longer-range implications. the debt ceiling. the second issue. another kind of artificial date. it has been in law for decades. congress periodically has a partisan debate over whether to extend it. an interesting debate since there really is no option. you either extend it or you default. the fault should not be an option. it is something that should be avoided at all costs. but we put this critical date in there so we can have the debate, have a vote and then extend the debt ceiling as we know we have to. finally we have the issue of the debt and deficit in the long run. the issues of real importance. we do not account for our expenditures the way businesses do, the way individuals have to. we get to account for them and ignore many of the long-term implications. if we were to put them in, it would increase the amount of the debt we owe and
of three months. what we need to be more focused on is to get through the fiscal cliff and get a deal done and lay the foundation for long-term fiscal reform. it is focused primarily on health care. >> senator, can you wait in on this? cbo, 10-year window, this is a requirement. congress needs to address these things. a roadmap, if you will. should we change the rules before we play the game? >> all of these extraordinary and practical ideas cannot survive in the cbo structure. that is a forcing mechanism. people are grasping onto ideas such as changing the age. people can easily explain it i and understand it instead of doing the more complex and difficult things that would get you where you want to go. i would be interested -- i have always opposed -- >> i did not hear that. >> directive scoring when it comes to cbo. i do think somehow and i think this is the governor's point, which is congress ignores a lot of stuff that makes sense. it gets wrapped up in its day- to-day activities. i honestly think you break out of this is if you get a white house and leadership in congress that are wi
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)